March Meeting: Jampro Antennas and Design Considerations of TV Spectrum Repacking

Broadcast TV antenna manufacturers should make some good sales numbers in the next couple of years as the FCC forces broadcasters to shuffle channels again. This time around, the emphasis will be on broadband designs. Jampro has been working to make their antennas work on multiple channels with minimal wind loading. Many broadcasters will be looking at designs that make the best use of ATSC 3.0 as well. There are things to keep in mind you as broadcast engineers may not have considered, like OFDM Crest Factor and circular polarization for mobile coverage. Jampro logo

As a bonus, they plan to talk about their experience in Singapore with DVB-T2 and Single Frequency Networks.

Join us March 15 at 12 noon at KGTV, 4600 Air Way near I-805 and CA-94 in San Diego for the Chapter 36 regular monthly meeting. Jampro is buying lunch in the cafeteria.

Come on by, and bring a friend.

 

FCC Proposes Permissive Use of ATSC 3.0

The FCC last week issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would give TV stations the right to use ATSC 3.0. This was made in response to a petition made in April 2016 by a consortium of Public Television, NAB, the Consumer Technology Association, and the AWARN Alliance.FCC Logo

There are several catches, however. One would require stations to continue broadcasting in ATSC 1.0 as they do now. The other is that manufacturers would not be required to produce equipment that could be used to decode the signals. The likelihood that broadcasters would use the technology is near zero, especially due to upcoming TV spectrum repacking that will use all available bandwidth in just about every market. A third hurdle is that consumers would have to bear the cost of converting the ATSC 3.0 signals to something usable with present TV sets.

Broadcasters and manufacturers will have an opportunity in the coming months to comment on the NPRM.

FCC Orders Fines for LA Pirate Broadcasters

Last week, the FCC announced fines for two San Fernando Valley parties accused of illegally broadcasting that we reported on in December 2016.

The Enforcement Bureau imposed a forfeiture order of $25,000 against Nelson Quintanilla for operating a pirate broadcast station on 95.1 MHz in Panorama City.

They also imposed a monetary forfeiture of $25,000 on Iglesia el Remanente Fraternidad Elim, Inc. and Belarmino Lara for operating a pirate radio station on 93.7 MHz in Arleta, near the intersection of I-5 and CA-118.

February 15 Meeting: Audio Precision and the Noise Floor

How Low Can You Go?

What are the capabilities of modern test equipment and its ability to test very low noise and distortion devices? Can test equipment of today keep up with increasingly impressive specs? Are the specs real? We’ll review some real world examples from both the electrical audio test world as well as room acoustics testing.

Join Chapter 36 Wednesday, February 15, at 12 noon at iHeartMedia, 9660 Granite Ridge Drive, San Diego. Audio Precision buys lunch. Members and visitors are welcome as always.

About the Presenter

Tony Spica recently joined Audio Precision after nine years with Bruel and Kjaer as an Application Engineer and Solution Manager. He is based in Los Angeles where he has lived and worked for the past eight years. Prior to joining Bruel and Kjaer, Tony worked as a NVH Engineer developing test systems to detect defects in automotive parts through sound and vibration signatures in Detroit, Michigan.

Society of Broadcast Engineers, San Diego